Ramon Bauer

Universität Wien / Statistical Analyst at City of Vienna, Lecturer

Courses

Demography of European Cities

Research interests

Keywords: urban diversity, spatial demography (of European cities and regions), global development (migration & human capital) and data visualisation

Population dynamics in urban/metropolitan regions: Urban demographic studies usually focus on cities within its administrative boundaries (i.e. the urban core). However, the settlement and functional area of cities normally sprawls beyond administrative boundaries. Hence, analyses of urban/metropolitan populations need to take into account both urban core and hinterland. What are the residential and mobility patterns of particular groups and how did these patterns change over time? How do (planning) policies cope with changing populations in different types of neighbourhoods within urban/metropolitan regions?

Demography of crisis-ridden cities: The current economic crisis affects the life or urban populations in crisis-ridden cities in many ways. What are the particularities and consequences of urban demographic change in times of crisis?

Contact

University of Vienna
Department of Geography and Regional Research
Universitaetsstrasse 7/5/D519 (NIG)
1010 Vienna, Austria

Tel: +43 1 4277 48781

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Heinz Fassmann

Universität Wien / Professor of Applied Geography, Regional Research and Spatial Planning (currently on leave)

Contact

Universitätsstraße 7, 1010 Vienna, Austria

Tel: +43-1 4277-48680
Fax: +43-1 4277 9486

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Yvonne Franz

Universität Wien / 4CITIES Local Coordinator and Lecturer

Courses

Contemporary Challenges in Urban Development, Urban Development and Planning in Eastern Europe, Urban Analysis 3

Research interests

Keywords: urban geography & planning, neighbourhood development, gentrification, public space, integration policies, governance, social innovation, practice approach, urban living labs

The emergence of new “arrival spaces”: The century of urbanization is characterized by established and newly emerging migration patterns. The process of “arriving to a city” becomes more complex and multi-layered as cities are not only growing by population, but they also face challenges with regard to housing shortage, gentrification processes and the need for multiple integration policies. Besides education and workplaces, the urban housing market is of crucial relevancy for the “arriving population”. Critical reflection is needed on the availability, accessibility and affordability of housing for new residents in order to assess the limitations of “arrival spaces” in cities.

The impact of social innovation in neighbourhood development: Social innovation has been an emerging concept across policy, practice and academia to overcome societal challenges by collaborative practices between civil society, private stakeholders and public actors. The basic understanding of social innovation can be broken down to “any co-created innovation closing the gap of public welfare state service and contributing to a societal benefit”. When it comes to urban studies and more precisely to socio-spatial analyses, the questions arises: How does social innovation impact neighbourhood development? This thesis aims at a better conceptual understanding on social innovation in neighbourhood development, the involved actors and framework conditions, as well as at the development of “social innovation proxies” to identify and measure the potential of social innovation at the local scale.

The role of public spaces for socially cohesive neighbourhoods: Living quality and human wellbeing have come under increased pressure in “successful cities” due to population growth, physical densification, economic valorisation, limited open space and an increased vulnerability to climate change. More than ever, public spaces have become increasingly important as spaces for leisure and relaxation, but even more importantly as spaces for (daily) appropriations, democratic participation and spaces of encounter in diversifying societies. The core interest in this field of research asks how public space can contribute to creating cities that are more ecologically, economically AND socially resilient.

Contact

University of Vienna
Department of Geography and Regional Research
Universitätsstraße 7/C406
1010 Vienna, Austria

Tel: +43 1 4277 48783

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Joshua Grigsby

Universität Wien / 4CITIES Assistant Programme Coordinator and Lecturer

Courses

Urban Research & the Master Thesis, Critical Topics in Urban Studies, Balkan City Excursion

Research interests

Keywords: urban planning, transdisciplinary research, decarbonization, climate change, transition, street design, complexity, psychogeography, cinema, visual geography

Engaging the unsolvable in planning theory & practice: Wicked problems are those that may be unsolvable for reasons of complexity, uncertainty, or disagreement. However, many wicked problems such as climate change or social injustice demand responses at the level of urban planning, which tends to be solutions-oriented. This begs the question, how can a solutions-oriented field effectively engage essentially unsolvable problems? Research in this area is often transdisciplinary, involving complexity theories and systems perspectives.

Radical approaches to post-carbon transition: Fossil fuels are sufficiently embedded into modern global systems (economic, political, and social) for sociologist John Urry to have written that “burning fossil fuels to generate heat, power and movement is the most significant feature of the modern world.” The global community appears to now be forced to choose between runaway climate change and rapid decarbonization, and either option is fraught with almost unfathomable implications. Focusing on the latter, what are the consequences of decarbonization? How might urban society be reshaped by this socio-technical transition, and what alternatives to the current “carbon regime” are feasible or desirable?

Psychogeography: At its most basic level, psychogeography is the study of how the spatial affects the psychological. With ecelctic roots in literature, philosophy, art, architecture, semiotics, and of course psychology and geography, psychogeographic research typically examines how interpretations of space and design impact emotional states and social practices, exposing in the process the fact that design generally and spatial interventions in particular are never neutral. Research methods include various forms of urban exploration, documentation, and visualization.

Realities & representations in visual geography: Geography, whether human or physical, is an inherently visual discipline. Visual geography is an emerging sub-discipline concerned with the depiction of spaces and spatially embedded practices in visual media such as film, photography, and painting. Cities, in cinema, are frequently both setting and character, and the ways in which cities perform and are peformed in films can either open up new ways of seeing and understanding or reify stereotypes and simplifications. Research casts a critical lens on the framing process of visual art in order to expose the implications of observed-observer dynamics: the what, where, who, how, why, and so what of place-performance.

Contact

University of Vienna
Department of Geography and Regional Research
Universitaetsstrasse 7/5/D519 (NIG)
1010 Vienna, Austria

Tel: +43-1-4277-48685

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Walter Matznetter

Universität Wien / Lecturer

Courses

Principles in Urban Planning and Urbanism, Urban Development and Planning in Eastern Europe, Vienna Transect Excursion

Research interests

Keywords: comparative urbanism, housing policy, education, internationalisation, infrastructure

Urban housing markets and housing policies: From pre-industrial times, housing shortage has been an endemic problem of cities. In the era of the welfare state, relief has come from national housing policies. With neoliberalisation, urban housing is being re-commercialized, and housing interventions are re-scaled downwards to the urban and regional levels – making comparative studies of selected urban housing sectors within the same nation-state or welfare regime, or between different states and welfare regimes a revealing field of research.

Internationalisation of higher education: The 4CITIES Master is part and parcel of a global phenomenon, the internationalisation of tertiary education. There are 3 million international students today, a mere 2% of all students worldwide. Within Europe, the  percentage is much higher, but most of it is intra-European mobility. The life-time repercussions of being internationally mobile are wide-ranging, but under-researched: from transnational ways of working and living, to international career patterns, to expat retirement colonies. Much of these lives has an urban focus, and offers avenues for innovation, travelling concepts and inspiration, sometimes frustration. At Vienna University, we have a large body of transcribed interviews with international students that could be used as a starting point for comparison.

Urban infrastructure in global cities: Despite globalisation, the material infrastructure of cities is highly uneven, even amongst European cities. Due to the longevity of investments, supply and cost of water, energy, transport etc. is deeply rooted/embedded in specific urban political/planning history. Infrastructure of different age, dimension and importance could be subject of comparative research, from tramway lines and Wi-Fi hotspots to waste collection and cash-machines. Even pre-industrial infrastructure is being utilized again, as cultural heritage and tourist attraction, think of aqueducts and fortifications.  As a global city, the quality of a city’s infrastructure is contributing to its attractiveness as a place for investment, hence to its competitiveness.

Contact

Institut für Geographie und Regionalforschung der Universität Wien
Universitätsstraße 7
1010 Wien, Austria

Tel: +43-1-4277-48683

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Axel Priebs

Universität Wien / Professor of Applied Geography, Regional Research, and Spatial Planning

Courses

Contemporary Challenges in Urban Development

Research interests

Keywords: spatial planning, city regions, suburban development, waterfront revitalization

Spatial Planning in City regions and suburban development: Urban regions have a broad diversity of spaces. Old core cities, former market towns, and villages have undergone fundamental changes and are parts of varying urban landscapes. The new suburban settlements which have spread into the landscape since the 1960s, however, are seen more and more critically for their lack of urban qualities. Which promising approaches for transformation of monotonous dwelling areas into living neighborhoods are being taken? What opportunities are appearing for new public spaces, new functional areas around public transport stations, and new urban centres?

Regional government and governance structures: While the regional level is identified as a central activity level in spatial sciences and planning, it has no formal planning or governance structure in many countries. Regional interdependences and connections generate many attempts to build informal structures and networks for regional governance, and formal decision structures and real competences for provision of basic services become more and more crucial for strengthening regions as functional bodies. But how do regional structures develop in different countries? Is there place for regional government between self-confident local authorities and powerful state agencies? Is it necessary to introduce regional structures with overall coverage or are individual institutional solutions possible in different regions of a country?

Transformation at the urban waterfronts: Since the 1960s, urban waterfronts have undergone fundamental changes. In seaport cities, former port functions and port related industries have moved out of the cities or abandoned, and new functions such as housing, offices, and entertainment have claimed the urban waterfront. Whilst in most of the seaports the transformation process is finished, urban waterfronts in many river cities are still facing ongoing transformations. Rivers are being rediscovered as a crucial opportunity for city development and as a potential for new public spaces or housing areas. What lessons can be learned from seaport transformations? Which kind of new developments and challenges are emerging in river cities?

Emerging importance of medium size cites in rural areas: While many city regions are undergoing a rapid growth process, many peripheral rural areas are losing jobs and residents. To maintain an attractive level of public and private services in those regions, regional development is focusing on medium size cities. Is it possible to use and strengthen these cities as stabilizers of rural areas? Which strategies can be identified in Europe’s medium size cities to accept this role? What are the prospects of cooperation between smaller and medium size cities, and can they combine to offer a full range of services?

Contact

University of Vienna
Department of Geography and Regional Research
Universitätsstrasse 7/5/D519 (NIG)
1010 Vienna, Austria

Tel: +43-1-4277-48787

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